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Klinger® Gaskets > Gasket materials / PTFE Products > KLINGERSIL range > KLINGERSIL C-8200 - Information for your safety



  Gasket materials / PTFE Products
KLINGERSIL range - KLINGERSIL C-8200
Information for your safety
 
The many and varied demands made on gaskets
The successful operation of a gasket depends upon a multiplicity of factors.
Many who use static gaskets believe that the values quoted for maximum admissible
temperature and maximum operating pressure are inherent properties or characteristics of
gaskets and gasket materials.
Unfortunately, this is not the case.
The maximum temperatures and pressures at which gaskets may be used are influenced by a large
number of factors.
Therefore a definite statement of these values for gasket material is not possible.
 
Important points to be observed
The selection of gaskets requires expertise and know-how since ever greater reliability coupled with the
lowest possible leakage rates are demanded of gasket materials.
The exacting demands made on the tightness of gasket materials (e.g. Tightness class L0.01) mean that with
increasing internal pressure higher surface pressures must be applied to the gasket.
It must be shown that the flange joint will tolerate the demands made on it without being mechanically
overloaded. Furthermore, the surface pressure applied to create the seal should never fall below the required
minimum value since this will reduce the life of the gasket. Highly stressed, but not overstressed gaskets have a
longer life than understressed gaskets.
If the gasket fitted will be subjected to non-static loading, or will suffer stress fluctuations during
discontinuous operation, it is advisable to choose a gasket which is not prone to
embrittlement with increasing temperature (e.g. KLINGERgraphite laminate or KLINGERtop-chem),
especially for steam and/or water applications.
For discontinuous operations in water and/or steam applications, we recommend as a general guide a
surface pressure of about 30 MPa.
In such cases the gasket should be as thin as is practicable. For reasons of safety, we advise against the re-use of gaskets.
 
Maximum gasket pressure in operating condition σBO in accordance with DIN 28090
This diagram shows the max.
permissible gasket pressure in MPa to
be applied as a function of the service
temperature. The values apply to the
stated gasket thicknesses.
 
Min. gasket pressure σVU for tightness classes L = 1.0, L = 0.1
and L = 0.01 in accordance with DIN 28090
This diagram shows the min.
gasket pressure necessary to achieve
the tightness for the above tightness
classes at room temperature. Tightness
class L= 0.1 allows a max. leakage of
1 mg nitrogen per second per meter of
gasket length (mg/s m).
The curves are shown for the standard
thickness material.
 
 
 
Minimum gasket pressure σBU for tightness class L = 0.1
This three-dimensional diagram
describes the behaviour of the gasket
material with respect to the required
minimum gasket pressure for a
complete temperature range at 2 mm
thickness. It clearly shows that the
required minimum load decreases at
medium and higher temperatures –
the gasket will seal at lower surface
loads under these conditions.
 
The fields of decision

(1) If your operating temperatures
and pressures fall within this field,
a technical examination is normally
unnecessary.
(2) If your operating temperatures
and pressures are within this field,
a technical examination is
recommended.
(3) If your operating temperatures
and pressures are within this ”open”
field, a technical examination is
always necessary.

*Gaskets according to DIN 2690 are only standardised
up to PN 40 and gasket thickness 2 mm.